Quotations on Stories

Standard

Stephen_King,_Comicon

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“There are books full of great writing that don’t have very good stories. Read sometimes for the story… don’t be like the book-snobs who won’t do that. Read sometimes for the words–the language. Don’t be like the play-it-safers who won’t do that. But when you find a book that has both a good story and good words, treasure that book.”

                                                                              Stephen King

 

Tim_obrien_2012

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“That’s what fiction is for. It’s for getting at the truth when the truth isn’t sufficient for the truth.”

                                                                              Tim O’Brien

J._K._Rowling_2010

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“There’s always room for a story that can transport people to another place.”

                                                                               J. K. Rowling

Advertisements

Magic In Stories: Revisited

Standard

feather-1300305_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

There is magic in stories. Magic is the transmutation of objects or the manipulation of the world in ways that move outside the realm of science. Whether or not magic is real in the sense of the here and now world is not the point; magic is a metaphor for fiction. It is an explanation of the way writers create characters and environments and how readers experience these creations.

Stephen King says, “books are a uniquely portable magic” (104). This magic is in the words, in their transmitting from the writer to the reader other worlds and ideas. In writing fiction, writers create a world that was not there; even so-called realistic, literary writers create an alternate world that readers inhabit when they read the book. The writers and the readers, in a mystical incantation, create another reality, one that can be so strong sometimes that readers can be moved to tears or laughter or sadness or joy or grief or sorrow or despair or hope. Readers come to care about the characters and feel empathy as if they were real. That is a kind of magic.

ship-2787544_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

Neil Gaiman, in his introduction to Ray Bradbury’s  60th Anniversary Edition Fahrenheit 451, speaks to the power of the written word and stories: “Ideas—written ideas—are special. They are the way we our stories and our thoughts from one generation to the next. If we lose them, we lose our shared history. We lose much of what makes us human. And fiction gives us empathy: it puts us inside the minds of other people, gives us the gift of seeing the world through their eyes. Fiction is a lie that tells us true things, over and over” (xvi). It is through the creation of artificial worlds, no matter how speculative or fantastic, that we experience our world in more intensity and with deeper clarity. This act of magic is what we share as writers and readers. I am honored to be a mere apprentice in the magic of writing novels.

Works Cited

Gaiman, Neil. “Introduction.” Ray Bradbury. 60th Anniversary Edition Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2013.

King, Stephen. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft. New York: Scribner, 2000.

book-863418_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

Magic In Books — Quotations

Standard

Stephen_King,_Comicon

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“Books are a uniquely portable magic.”

                                                                 Stephen King

J._K._Rowling_2010

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

“I don’t believe in the kind of magic in my books. But I do believe something very magical can happen when you read a good book.”

                                                                 J. K. Rowling

ray-28744__340

“The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us.”

                                                                Ray Bradbury

Quotations on Creativity–Revisited

Standard

leonardo-1200-gray-crop-scale-200x281

(self-portrait 1512)

“The painter has the Universe in his mind and hands.”

                                          Leonardo da Vinci

 

Twyla_Tharp

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“Creativity is an act of defiance.”

                                 Twyla Tharp

 

220px-Stephen_King,_Comicon

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“Some part of me knew from the first that what I wanted was not reality but myth.”

                                                     Stephen King

 

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbook

Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

FOE_Cover_French

 

Available on Amazon

Dining With Characters, Part 4–Revisited

Standard

Romantic_Landscape'_by_John_Trumbull,_Dayton_Art_Institute

(commons.wikipedia.org)

(John Trumball)

I chose this painting for the mood of calm it suggests, perhaps after a storm.  It seems like an ideal piece to suggest that redemption is possible.

For this particular culinary and fictional interlude, I want to speak with a few characters who have achieved redemption at the end of the work in which they appear: Ebeneezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Leontes from William Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale and Larry Underwood from Stephen King’s The Stand. Some characters are heroic from the beginning of the story through to the end, but some, if not the complete antagonist of the tale, are deeply flawed. In the cases of these three characters they are all deeply damaged, if not morally defective, when we see them much earlier in their respective works.

A_Christmas_Carol,_Ignorance_and_Want_by_John_Leech

https://commons.wikipedia.org

I thought, given the nature of these men, an afternoon of a few glasses of ale might be the perfect way to discuss what they have learned or how they came to an understanding of what they needed to change in their lives. Scrooge, of course, had to learn not to focus his life on the acquisition and hoarding of material goods, and that people and their welfare should be his concern.

Pauline_Implores_Leontes

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leontes)

Leontes, in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, allows baseless and unprovoked jealousy to overtake him, and he becomes a vicious tyrant who casts out his loving wife and infant daughter.  He also loses his son to death as a consequence of his terrible actions. It is only at the end of the play when he sees a “statue” of his wife Hermione come to life that he is able to understand the enormous errors he has made and their horrible consequences.  He has to face knowing that his actions cause deep and almost unimaginable pain to other people.  At the end of the play, he is a changed man, one who seemingly has grown as a result of his wife’s extraordinary act of mercy.  His redemption can come only through the forgiveness of another.

The_Stand_cover

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stand)

At the beginning of Stephen King’s epic The Stand, Larry Underwood is a dissolute rock and roll emerging star, who has fallen prey to temptation, drugs, and a very dangerous crowd. He comes back east to visit his mother just in time for the outbreak of Captain Trips. If you have not read this book, I will go no further with the plot, but I do recommend it highly.  King acknowledged that this book was his homage to Lord Of The Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien and the same level of epic sweep and individual morality and action occurs here.  For Larry Underwood, his most powerful moment is that of personal sacrifice.

As a writer, a reader, and a teacher, I am very interested in how characters change within the arc of a story.  I would want to ask these three how it felt to achieve their most powerful changes at or near the climax of the pieces.

Are there any characters, who have achieved redemption, whom you would like to speak with about their journey within their tale?

 

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbook

Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

FOE_Cover_French

 

Available on Amazon

Who Is Your Favorite Horror Writer?

Standard

I have been enjoying doing this series on favorite writers, and I hope you have all been liking it also! For this entry, I wanted to mention my favorite horror writers. This, like with the other genres of writers, is difficult because there are so many excellent authors.

stephen_king,_comicon

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

I will begin with Stephen King, the writer I think is the consummate horror writer, in addition to working in many other genres. I realize that as an academic, I risk having the Gods of the Academy shoot lightning bolts at me for saying making this claim, but I think King is one of the best writers of our time, and his work rises to stand along other great literary figures. Among his best horror novels are The Stand, The Shining, and It.

Anne_Rice

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

Anne Rice is my next choice. With her vampire series, she rejuvenated what had been a tired approach to a classic monster. Almost all writers who have explored vampires since then owe a debt to her for showing what was possible. I am pleased that she has returned to  her vampire series after a hiatus of quite a few years. Some of her best novels are Interview With The Vampire, The Vampire Lestat, and Prince Lestat.

 

Bram_Stoker_1906

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

My next choice in the horror genre is Bram Stoker, the author of the classic novel,
Dracula.
While I will not make a claim that his other novels rise to the level of this book, Dracula is so powerful and so important that his writing of it makes him one of the most important horror writers of any era.

I ask all of you: who is your favorite horror writer?

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbook

Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

FOE_Cover_French

 

Available on Amazon

Who Are Some Of Your Favorite Speculative Writers?

Standard

I thought it would be interesting to hear who are some of your favorite writers of speculative fiction, which can include fantasy, science-fiction, and horror. Of course, other genres might be included.

For me, I think my favorites are

Stephen King

stephen_king,_comicon

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

Among his novels are The Stand, The Shining, and Hearts In Atlantis.

 

Neil Gaiman

Gaiman,_Neil_(2007)

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

Some of his books are American Gods, Neverwhere, and Coraline.

and

Carlos Ruiz Zafon

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

(https://de.wikipedia.org)

Among his novels are The Shadow Of The Wind, The Prisoner of Heaven, and The Angel’s Game.

So, I ask you: who are some of your favorite speculative writers?