More Reviews of Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book 1 by Charles F. French

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Here are a few more reviews of my novel:

“This is not your typical horror story. This might be more of a love story within a horror setting. Without giving anything away there are two moments in the book where I felt raw emotions for the characters plight and these were very loving moments in the book. There are various depictions of love and loss throughout the book and they are heartfelt moments that left me wanting more of these backstories. The other moment at the end of the book truly tugged at my heartstrings.

I enjoyed the idea of older gentlemen as the main characters of the book. Your heroes stumble through old age fighting to save the life of an innocent. This is not your typical horror story, so throw all your expectations out the window because what you will find is a tale of heroism, love, compassion and heart.”

Delia

 

“This is an engrossing ghost tale that I could not put down! It combines ancient Rome with modern-day ghost hunters, rich in character and plot!”

John P. Roccaro

 

This is a delightfully unique horror story with extremely well developed, likable characters. French’s style is engaging and highly readable. I had a hard time putting this book down; it kept calling me.

Judy Sigdel

 

Thank you to all for your very kind words!

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

 

Quotations on Writing by Ray Bradbury

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(https://pixabay.com)

“Write only what you love, and love what you write. The key word is love. You have to get up in the morning and write something you love, something to live for.”

 

“You fail only if you stop writing.”

 

“You must write every single day of your life.”

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(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

My book Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I by Charles F. French is now in the Lehigh University Library!

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I am very excited to say that my horror novel, Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I  is now in the humanities library, Linderman Library, at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA! This is something for which I am very grateful and deeply satisfied. I have been connected to Lehigh University for many years; I earned my M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in English Literature at this school, and now I teach there as an adjunct professor.

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Having my novel included in the new books section is a serious honor, one of which I will be proud for the rest of my life.

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Thank you to Heather Simoneau for the photographs!

And please consider voting for the cover of my book in authorshout.com’s Cover Wars.

Please visit this site to vote!  Cover Wars

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I by Charles F. French is now available on Kindle!

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I have big news about my horror novel Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I.  It is now available on Kindle through Amazon!  I am still putting the finishing touches on the print version through Createspace, and I will notify you when it is ready!

To purchase a copy,

click here

Thank you!

 

My Kickstarter Update

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My Kickstarter campaign to raise initial publishing and promotional funds for my horror novel Maledicus: Investigative Paranormal Society Book I is moving along well. I have raised $815 so far out of a goal of $1000.  Please consider helping with the final push. I have 20 days left in the campaign. Thank you!

The Courtesan’s Avenger by Kate M. Colby: Themes in a Series

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I would like to welcome author Kate M. Colby to my blog.  In this post, she discusses the issue of themes in a series of novels. Kate is an excellent writer, one I am proud to know. I respect her abilities and writing, and I have used her previous novel The Cogsmith’s Daughter (Desertera #1) in two of my college English literature classes.  So, welcome Kate please as she discusses Themes in a Series:

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 What makes a good book series? Most readers would say a captivating world, strong characters, and an overarching mission or journey. I absolutely agree … but I think there’s something missing there. Theme.

While books can (and should) offer escape and entertainment, they have the ability to do so much more than that. Fiction allows authors the opportunity to explore topics that matter to them on neutral ground, to expose and evaluate unsavory aspects of society, to celebrate all that makes up this wonderful and crazy human experience. As someone who blended sociology and English in university, this is exactly what I try to do in my fiction.

The world of my Desertera series is a steampunk wasteland. It’s about as far from reality as I could run. But the themes within the world really hit home with me, and have with several of my readers, too. My first novel, The Cogsmith’s Daughter, is a revenge tale. When Aya, my protagonist, was a young girl, the king had her father executed for treason. Therefore, at first opportunity, Aya joins a plot to avenge her father’s death and trap the king into a crime, thus bringing about his execution.

If I’ve done my job as a writer, the readers should be on Aya’s side. They should seethe with anger and root for her to succeed in orchestrating the king’s execution. They should identify with Aya’s quest for self-redemption, love, and the reclaiming of her sexuality. They should be appalled at the social injustices in the world, the stratification of class and wealth, and the hypocritical palace politics – all things that can be found in reality.

When I set out to write the sequel, The Courtesan’s Avenger, I wanted to tackle a lot of these same themes. Class struggle remains a central issue, along with love and sexuality, friendship, and self-discovery. However, I knew I had a responsibility to address the other side of revenge: justice.

I had to face the ugly truth of the morality I had exalted. As much as I respect Aya and her mission, revenge isn’t healthy. Even if it is “justified,” it can turn a good person evil, blind them to their own wrongdoings, and pose troubling moral questions for a society. After all, if Aya can (essentially) murder and (definitely) commit crimes to avenge her father, what’s to stop the other citizens from doing the same to address their own grievances?

Enter Dellwyn and The Courtesan’s Avenger. When one of Dellwyn’s fellow courtesans is murdered, she doesn’t desire revenge or any sort of payback. She wants justice. Her whole goal in finding the killer is to submit them to the authorities and the judgment of law. She doesn’t take justice into her own hands, doesn’t commit any crimes, and even condemns Aya’s actions from the first novel. Dellwyn has seen how Aya’s quest for revenge created rifts in their world, and she refuses to do the same.

This is all a longwinded way of saying that theme, just as much as characters and setting and plot, is a central part of writing a book series. As an author, you have the opportunity to highlight the wrongs and praise the good you see in society. You can help readers gain empathy for the corrupt, question their sense of right and wrong, or just consider an issue they’d never thought about before.

Readers, you have the greatest blessing of all. You get to pick and choose what to take with you. Every book, no matter how thematically driven, leaves a piece of itself with us. Pride and Prejudice encourages us not to judge others too harshly and be open to love, The Girl on the Train reminds us to take responsibility for our actions, and The Picture of Dorian Gray condemns vanity, self-indulgence, and moral duplicity. At least, that’s what I get from those three – your interpretations could be entirely different! You can take the author’s message at face value, mine for deeper meaning, discover something the author didn’t know was there, or ignore it all completely. That’s the beauty of theme.

So, fellow writers, have the courage to experiment and make theme a central part of your series. It’s not just for stand-alone literary fiction novels. And, fellow readers, examine everything the author presents and take whatever it is you need. Every possible meaning lurks between those pages, and you can have whichever one you like.

Happy reading!

Author bio:

Kate M. Colby is an author of science fiction, fantasy, and nonfiction. Her first series, Desertera, consists of steampunk fantasy novels with themes of socio-economic disparity, self-empowerment, romance, and revenge. She lives in the United States with her husband and furry children.

 

Book links:

The Cogsmith’s Daughter (Desertera #1) – http://books2read.com/the-cogsmiths-daughter

The Courtesan’s Avenger (Desertera #2) – http://books2read.com/the-courtesans-avenger

Social links:

Website – http://www.katemcolby.com

Goodreads – http://www.goodreads.com/katemcolby

Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/authorkatemcolby

Twitter – http://www.twitter.com/katemcolby    

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My Kickstarter Campaign has begun!

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Good morning to everyone!  I have just launched my Kickstarter campaign to raise initial publishing funds for  my horror novel Maledicus: Investigative Paranormal Society Book I.

 

 

To find the page, please go to https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1119587941/maledicus-give-a-horror-novel-a-chance?ref=category

Please visit this page, and let me know what you thank, and thank you in advance to anyone who donates!

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