R.I.P. Senator John McCain

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John McCain (1939-2018) died today after a battle with brain cancer. He was a U.S. Navy veteran, a prisoner of war, a Senator, and a candidate for the Presidency of the United States of America. He was also a person of independent thinking, who often said he asked this question when facing difficult choices: what would Teddy Roosevelt have done?

He was someone with whom I disagreed on many issues of politics, but I have great respect for his service to the county, his integrity, and his decency. I will never forget how he responded to a person who claimed that Obama was not an American, and McCain said, “He’s a decent family man, a citizen that I just happen to have disagreements with on fundamental issues, and that’s what this campaign is all about.” (time.com)

John McCain was a good, decent, and honorable man. His memory will be honored in good thoughts for much longer than that of the present corrupt administration whose leader disparaged McCain’s military service.

Rest In Peace John McCain

Works Cited

http://time.com/4866404/john-mccain-barack-obama-arab-cancer/

R.I.P. Elie Wiesel

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Elie Wiesel, the Nobel laureate, and author of Night, his memoir of being a prisoner in the Holocaust, died this weekend.  Mr. Wiesel, besides being an extraordinary writer, whose work brought the experience of the evil of the Holocaust to the forefront of many readers, was also one of the most powerful moral voices of our time.

I read Mr. Wiesel’s book Night as a teenager, and I was deeply struck by the power and the messages it contains.  I made a connection with the horror of the Holocaust and the hope of humanity through this text.  I will keep the discussion of my personal impact of this book short, because it is so deep and so complex that I could write forever on it.  But, it was another lesson that we are all connected and must remember this joint humanity–always.

Mr. Wiesel argued powerfully that it is not enough to simply not do evil, but that it is the moral responsibility of people to oppose it wherever it exists. He said, “Whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation, we must always take sides.” and “As long as one dissident is in prison, our freedom will not be true. As long as one child is hungry, our lives will be filled with anguish and shame. What all these victims need above all is to know that they are not alone; that we are not forgetting them, that when their voices are stifled we shall lend them ours, that while their freedom depends on ours, the quality of our freedom depends on theirs. (From his Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech.)

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President Obama, in speaking of him, said of Mr. Wiesel, “Elie Wiesel was one of the great moral voices of our time, and in many ways, the conscience of the world.”

We should honor his work and commitment to justice, and we should remember, especially in our turbulent times, often filled with hatred and bigotry, that we are morally compelled to oppose injustice and bigotry.

Rest In Peace, Elie Wiesel.  The world will miss you.