Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

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Maledicus Final

I have changed the title of my horror novel Evil Lives After to Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I.  An extraordinary cover has been designed for the book by Judy Bullard at customebookcovers@cox.net.  I recommend her highly. Her designs are professional and of excellent quality, and Judy will work with you to create the cover you need and are happy with!

I am targeting late September for the book’s release.

Here is a little about my novel:

“All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” (Edmund Burke)

Roosevelt Theodore Franklin attempts to make it through life day by day.  Roosevelt is a widower, who lost his beloved wife to cancer and a retired history professor, and he has not stopped grieving.  Along with his two closest friends, also retired and who have also lost loved ones, the three men form a paranormal investigation group.  They hope to find an answer to the question: is there life after death?

When asked by a local teacher to investigate a possible haunting of her house, the group discovers an evil beyond anything they could have imagined.  This is no mere ghost. Maledicus, who was in life a pimp, torturer, and murderer during Caligula’s reign in Rome, in death has become a sociopathic demon that attacks the weak and the innocent.  Maledicus threatens a five year old child’s life and soul.  Terrified by what they have discovered, Roosevelt and his friends must choose to either walk away from this threat, or to do battle with this ancient creature at the potential loss of their sanities, their lives, and their souls.

Look for my book to follow this battle.

Favorite Horror Films of the 1960s: The Brides of Dracula

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(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

A tsunami of horror films cascaded into movie theaters in the 1960s, some by the larger studios and an abundance of grade B-Z films from smaller companies. Following the success of Horror of Dracula, The Curse of Frankenstein, and The Mummy, Hammer created a plethora of sequels as well as new horror films. Frankenstein and Dracula would serve as the basis for the most sequels, thereby creating a seemingly non-ending money source for the studio, even as the films often became bad imitations of the original productions.

Oddly, the first sequel to The Horror of Dracula, The Brides of Dracula, (1960) does not feature Dracula as a character. Instead, the movie features a Baron Meinster, as the opening voice-over narration says is a disciple of the ongoing cult of vampirism led by the now destroyed Dracula. While Dracula does not appear, the renowned vampire hunter Dr. Van Helsing does as played once more by Peter Cushing. Along with Baron Frankenstein, this role would establish Cushing as a major horror film star of the 1950s-1970s.

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

The characters are indirectly based on Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, the foundation for most vampire films, until Anne Rice’s revolutionary treatment of the undead in Interview With The Vampire.

The plot involves a young teacher who is “wooed” by a Baron Meinster. He proposes to her, while intending to make her his vampire bride. The tone of the film is clearly Gothic, with an architectural focus on a castle, the threatened young maiden, and a Bryonic Hero–the Baron.  These are standard, but not all inclusive, elements of a Gothic tale, and the Byronic Hero is typically a sexually attractive and threatening person, but more importantly, someone who lives according to his or her own rules, ignoring  the dictates of society.

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

While much of the film does not break new earth in exploring the vampire story, it does feature one very unusual twist. In one sequence, Dr. Van Helsing is attacked by a vampire and bitten. He passes out, and when he awakens, he is able to remove the curse of the vampire bite. He heats an iron in glowing coals, then uses it to cauterize the bite and finally pours holy water onto the wound. It works and suggest that the vampire attacks are not merely demonic but also infections. This motif is one that will be greatly developed in many later vampire novels, TV shows, and films.

Van Helsing is successful in destroying the vampire and saving the young woman. The motif of the holy symbols are repeated: Van Helsing throws holy water onto the face of the Vampire, repelling and burning him, and then he is able to catch the Baron in the shadow of a giant cross, which destroys him.

Terence Fisher directed, and the film did well enough at the box office to justify a chain of sequels. Even though Christopher Lee did not appear in this movie, he would soon return to reprise the role of Count Dracula in the near future.

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

Rest In Peace Pat Conroy

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PatConroy

The world of letters, of books, of reading, and of writing lost another important figure on Friday 3/4/16. Best known for his books The Prince of Tides and The Great Santini, Conroy was a major figure in American literature. Conroy lived in South Carolina, and his books frequently featured a southern setting, but they often dealt with universal themes: family and its difficulties and conflicts, war, oppression, exploitation, love, and violence.

His works also include: The Lords of Discipline, Beach Music, My Reading Life, and South of Broad. Several of his writing were made into successful movies.

Conroy said, “Writing is more about imagination than anything else. I fell in love with words. I fell in love with storytelling.”

Rest In Peace Pat Conroy

Favorite Horror Films of the 1960s: Psycho

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(https://it.wikipedia.org)

It is time to both revisit and move forward with my series on horror films. Psycho (1960) is a Paramount Film that was both produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock and was based on the novel Psycho by Robert Bloch.  This movie stands as one of the best, not only horror but American, films as a whole. Hitchcock is, without a doubt, an auteur, one of the great Masters of American cinema, and this film had huge influence on the creation of slasher films and psychopathic villains in films.

The film revolutionized the way the public viewed evil; it did not have to be supernaturally based nor a radiation caused event; rather, Hitchcock established that the human mind and life experience could create more frightening monsters than vampires and werewolves. These are people who suffered horror, and their creators were other people, at least in most cases of psychopathology.

Psycho_gip

(https://it.wikipedia.org)

Psycho had an exemplary cast. Among the actors were Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Martin Balsam, and Vera Miles. All gave extraordinary performances in this movie.  From the deeply disturbing opening sequence of the murder in the shower to the end revelation of Norman Bates’ level of insanity, the film is a masterpiece of cinema.

Hitchcock’s cinematic formalism is evident in his complete control of every detail of each shot. This is a film that is created with the planned brushstrokes of a master artist. The power of the murder scene in the Bates Motel bathroom is so strong that many people watch it and believe they have seen much more than they actually have.  Hitchcock never shows the killer’s knife entering the body of Marion Crane, played by Janet Leigh.  Hitchcock’s use of careful angles and reaction shots as the young women is being murdered makes the viewers perceive more than is being shown on the screen.  The effect is far more powerful than later films which would rely primarily on gore to have an impact and not on story and cinematic technique.

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

It is also interesting to note that the first victim, Marion Crane, was a woman who had committed a crime, in the theft of a substantial amount of money from her boss.  Hitchcock would establish this pattern that was too often used to the point of becoming cliched that the so-called “bad” girl was the one to be killed.  Additionally, if Norman Bates is also viewed as a victim of the circumstances of his own life, then the film focuses primarily on the impact of these crimes on the young.  This is certainly not exclusive; others who are older are also attacked, but Hitchcock seemed to be exploring the effect of this horror on the younger generation. Perhaps he also understood that group was the primary audience for his film.

Psycho made an extraordinary profit at the box office, and it was nominated for several Academy Awards.  Its legacy is well established. Norman Bates is a character who has grown past this film and entered into the public’s awareness through other remakes and adaptations, and many of the motifs of horror/slasher/gothic films are derived from this movie.

Psycho must be seen as one of the best films in American cinema, and Hitchcock is one of the American film masters. If you have not seen this movie and are prepared for powerful images and shocks, then I recommend it highly. It is one of the best films of all time.

 

R.I.P. Umberto Eco and Harper Lee

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https://tr.wikipedia.or

The world lost two of its most important writers today, Friday February 19, 2016: Harper Lee and Umberto Eco.  I offer this small post in remembrance of their brilliance.

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https://en.wikipedia.org

Umberto Eco was a renowned professor of semiotics, the study of language and signs, as well as a best-selling novelist, and he died at the age of 84. He is probably best known outside of the academic world for his novel The Name of the Rose and the successful Hollywood film based on it, which  starred Sean Connery.  The book was, on the surface, a medieval murder mystery that was heavily influenced by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his great detective Sherlock Holmes. It was also a multi-layered exploration of the medieval as well as the contemporary world. Eco incorporated a difficult series of puzzles and codes within the text by utilizing his knowledge of semiotics, and his labyrinthine library was based on the writing of Jorge Luis Borges.   The Name Of The Rose established Eco’s career as a novelist, which he followed up with books like Foucault’s Pendulum.   His writing entertains on  the surface and then challenges the reader to delve deeply into intellectual exploration of the world.

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https://ru.wikipedia.org

Harper Lee,  the novelist whose seminal work on racism and justice in America To Kill A Mockingbird, also died today.  She was 89 years old. Her book focused attention on racism and the lack of justice in southern small-town America as well as the attempt by her hero Atticus Finch to fight for the life of a black man accused of raping a young white woman. This book, and the enormously successful film based on her novel by the same name and starring Gregory Peck, a powerful adaptation, are both beloved and masterpieces of literature and film. In 2015, Lee released a book that can be seen as a sequel, prequel, or adaptation of To Kill a MockingbirdGo Set A Watchman.

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http://thereadersreview.org

As a reader, I have loved their writings.  I have also used To Kill A Mockingbird and The Name Of The Rose in my college classes.  Both books presented challenges to my students as well as great rewards for the studying of them.

The world has lost two powerful and deeply important writers.

Rest in Peace: Harper Lee and Umberto Eco.

 

Tour For the Re-release of The Curious Tale of Gabrielle by Zachary Paul Chopchinski

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I am very pleased to be one of the hosts on the blog tour of the re-release for The Curious Tale of Gabrielle by Zachary Paul Chopchinski. Mr. Chopchinski is a talented writer, whom I have had the honor of meeting through the world of the blog, and I hope all of you consider reading his book!

Mr. Chopchinski discusses his reasons for the re-release:

As with many things in life, you will always be your own worst critic. This is not only true in my case, but a savage reality that drives much of what I do. I look at my writing as an extension of myself, it is something that I created and breathed life into. You strive for perfection in what you create as it mirrors its creator, no? This is one of the primary factors behind me re-releasing my first book in a second edition.

There are many things that I had to accept and overcome with the first edition of The Curious Tale of Gabrielle. There were plenty of grammatical issues, to start. I like to believe that I am a gifted wordsmith, however it is impossible to produce a good piece of work without proper editing. This is exactly what I was missing as I couldn’t afford a conventional editor the first time through. While I was proud of what I did put forth, there was a lot to be desired in the final fit and finish. So the first step that I took was to enlist the assistance of a proper editor. Which made the first huge leap.

Secondly, as I am working on the next steps of the journey, I began to look at what will become of Gabrielle and the adventures ahead of her. I realized that, as I was currently writing, there was a lack of a running antagonist. All of the books would be stand-alone with their endings bringing the end to that story. I felt that by introducing a secondary protagonist (Morrigan), who will give Gabrielle someone to grow and develop with, this would lay the foundation and allow for the introduction of a running antagonist. I thought that this would bring a bit more depth and realism to the series. As my readers grow and develop relationships with the light in my books, they must first respect the shadow. So I designed and introduced a theme that will develop into essentially a fight between good and evil.

I also wanted to expand on the story a bit. For selfish reasons, I wanted to put my book at around the 70,000 word mark so that, by definition, it was a novel. This may seem petty, and I don’t mean for it to. I set a goal for myself to write a novel, and that is what I intended to do. I cannot bake a singular brownie and then proclaim it to be a cake.
So with the extensions of the book, the proper editing and accepting my own flaws, developing more profound foundation for the future works, and placing my book in an arena where I can look to it and be proud of what I have created, I felt that sending it out into the world with a proper sendoff was fitting. Hence the re-release.

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Author Bio:

Zachary is 27 and lives in Florida with his lovely wife, Layla. The two of them share a home with their four fur-children.

Zachary has degrees in Criminal Justice and Criminology. He had two short stories and a poem published by Ohio State University. Zachary has always had two passions in his life, criminal justice and writing. After spending nearly 5 years working in security, he decided it was time to give his other passion a chance.

Zachary is very much a family man and when he is not deep in writing, he can be found spending time with his family, playing video games or contemplating his next story idea.

Author and Book Links:

Where to buy the book:

The first edition of the book can be found on the following sites. However, the second (expanded) edition will be available on March 25.

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Curious-Tale-Gabrielle-1/dp/1508423938/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1453249542&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Curious+tale+of+gabrielle

From Me (cheaper rates): http://zachchop.com/mywork/

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/524345

Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/books/details

/Zachary_Paul_Chopchinski_The_Curious_Tale_of_Gabri?id=k4XjBgAAQBAJ&hl=en

Connect with me on social media

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Zachary-Paul-Chopchinski-772308849490741/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Website: http://zachchop.com

Tumblr: http://an-author-and-his-books.tumblr.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ZachChop

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/9853623.Zachary_Paul_Chopchinski

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Mr. Chopchinski,

Thank you for appearing on my blog!

Sam’s Chicken Paprikash

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It has been a while since I have talked about the characters from my horror novel Evil Lives After. Sam Sadlowski is one of three founding members of the BPCS, the Bethberg Paranormal Consulting Society, a ghost and supernatural investigation group, that is central to my book.

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https://pixabay.com

Sam is a retired homicide detective and an avid cook.  But he doesn’t do any of “that high-class stuff served on a plate too large and a portion too small,” as he would say. A proud descendant of Polish and Hungarians, he loved the peasant food he grew up with. He loves hearty food and plenty of it.

One of his favorite foods was a meal his mother made often when he was growing up.  Here is his version of Chicken Paprikash:

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(Photo By Liz French, 2016)

Ingredients:

2 pounds chicken, either breast or thighs

2 green bell peppers

2 large onions

1 pound button mushrooms

1 can crushed tomatoes

paprika — regular or hot depending on the level of desired heat

fresh ground black pepper

garlic

pinch of salt (optional)

sour cream

either dumplings or wide noodles

To prepare:

Use a large dutch oven, preferably of cast iron.

Boil the chicken for a few minutes to begin the cooking process, then transfer to the dutch oven that has a hot layer of cooking oil in it that has been heavily coated with paprika, so that the oil looks red.  Be sure to pat the chicken dry first with a paper towel to avoid oil splattering.

While the chicken is searing, on both sides, chop the peppers and onions. Clean the mushrooms with cold water and a paper towel.

After the chicken is seared, turn the heat to low or simmer.

Add the peppers, onions, and mushrooms.

Add the seasoning.

Add the crushed tomatoes.

Add two-four tablespoons sour cream, and mix completely.

Let simmer in the dutch oven for 1 & 1/2 to 2 hours.

Cook the noodles or dumplings.

To Serve:

Serve over noodles or dumplings in a large bowl.

Slick thick pieces of good bread to place on the side.

Sam prefers to drink Hungarian red wine: egri bikaver, which translates loosely as “bull’s blood” with the meal.

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If you enjoy hearty meals, give this a try. You will probably enjoy Sam’s recipe.