Who Is Your Favorite Fictional Hero?

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In continuing my series on favorite fictional characters, I decided to ask today’s question about heroes. This one is very tough for me, because there are so many possibilities from which I can choose. Among the many I have considered are Mina Harker from Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Henry V from Shakespeare’s play of the same name, and Captain America from the Marvel Comics. I will, however, use the technique that I recommend for students on tests and quizzes–to go with your first choice when asked a question.  Now, that typically refers to memory, but I will still use it.

The one character who came to mind before any other was Aragorn from J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord Of The Rings.  He is the leader who does not care about his own safety, who fights in the front lines with the soldiers he leads into combat, and he views the hobbits as his equals.

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

So, I ask all of you: who is your favorite fictional hero?

Who Is Your Favorite Fictional Villain?

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

In continuing my series of favorite characters from books, I wanted today to explore fictional villains, those people we love to hate or who capture our imagination.  They sometimes make us quake in fear and wonder about the darkness.

There are so many wonderfully written villains to draw from that the choice of my favorite is difficult. Among the many possibilities are Sauron from J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord Of The Rings, Dracula from Bram Stoker’s novel, Dr. Hannibel Lechter from Thomas Harris’ The Silence Of The Lambs, and Claudius from Shakespeare’s Hamlet. As I mentioned, there are many other possibilities. Would it be immodest to suggest my own character Maledicus from my novel Maledicus The Investigative Paranormal Society Book 1?

My choice, however, is from the book that is one of the largest influences on me as a reader and writer, and that is Dracula!

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

So, I ask all of you: who is your favorite fictional villain?

 

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbook

Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

FOE_Cover_French

 

Available on Amazon

coverIPScookbook

Available on Amazon

 

Who Is Your Favorite Magical Character?

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I am beginning a new series for this blog today about favorite characters.  I will begin with magical/mystical characters, but the one requirement for these choices is that they are from books or poetry or drama–some kind of writing.

When I ask who is your favorite magical/mystical character, I mean specifically any character who can perform magic, not simply someone who appears in a magical world.

For me, this is very difficult, because I have so many from which I can choose; among them are Merlin from Le Morte d’Arthur by Sir Thomas Mallory, Prospero from The Tempest by Shakespeare, Harry Potter and Dumbledore from The Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling, and Gandalf from The Lord Of The Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien. I am sure I am forgetting some, but I will make a choice, and my favorite magical character is Gandalf!

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(https://pixabay.com)

 

So,  I ask all of you: who is your favorite magical/mystical character?

Quotations on Fantasy Literature

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“One day, you will be old enough to start reading fairytales again.”

                                                                          C. S. Lewis

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“Fantasy fiction is essentially about the concept of power; great fantasy fiction is about people who find it at great cost or lose it tragically; mediocre fantasy fiction is about people who have it and never lose it but simply wield it.”

                                                                        Stephen King

 

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https://en.wikiquote.org

“Fantasy is escapist, and that is its glory. If a soldier is imprisoned by the enemy, don’t we consider it his duty to escape?. . .If we value the freedom of mind and soul, if we’re partisans of liberty, then it’s our plain duty to escape, and to take as many people with us as we can!”

                                                                       J. R. R. Tolkien

Quotations on Idealism–Revisited

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I am an unapologetic idealist, a dreamer, and an optimist. As a writer and teacher, I find these qualities to be essential. I continue to see ways to improve the world, no matter how many losses or setbacks occur.

We must always stand up for what is right, what is worth fighting for, and for those who cannot fight for themselves.

Here are a few quotations about idealism:

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people
Living life in peace

You may say that I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope someday you’ll join us
And the world will be as one”

                                                                                John Lennon

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“Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring, those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”

                                                                            Robert Kennedy

 

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(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“There is some good in this world, and it’s worth fighting for.”

                                                                              J. R. R. Tolkien

What Are Some Of Your Favorite Children’s Books?

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Continuing this series on favorites authors and books, I thought it would be fun to compile a list of beloved children’s books.

Without further ado (with apologies to Shakespeare), here are my three offerings:

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Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. Published in 1883, this tale of adventure and pirates is not only a wonderful read, but also it is an excellent book to draw in reluctant readers.

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(https://pixabay.com)

Next on my list is The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. Unlike his adult British mythology–The Lord Of The Rings, The Hobbit is a lovely adventure story that was aimed at children. It is an excellent introduction to the world of fantasy.

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Last on my list, which I am sure is highly incomplete, is The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. Winner of the Newberry Medal for best children’s books, this tale deals with a young orphaned boy who is raised by the ghosts and other otherworldly creatures in a cemetery. It is delightful!

So, I ask all of you: what are some of your favorite children’s books?

Dining With Characters, Part 4–Revisited

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(commons.wikipedia.org)

(John Trumball)

I chose this painting for the mood of calm it suggests, perhaps after a storm.  It seems like an ideal piece to suggest that redemption is possible.

For this particular culinary and fictional interlude, I want to speak with a few characters who have achieved redemption at the end of the work in which they appear: Ebeneezer Scrooge from Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, Leontes from William Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale and Larry Underwood from Stephen King’s The Stand. Some characters are heroic from the beginning of the story through to the end, but some, if not the complete antagonist of the tale, are deeply flawed. In the cases of these three characters they are all deeply damaged, if not morally defective, when we see them much earlier in their respective works.

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https://commons.wikipedia.org

I thought, given the nature of these men, an afternoon of a few glasses of ale might be the perfect way to discuss what they have learned or how they came to an understanding of what they needed to change in their lives. Scrooge, of course, had to learn not to focus his life on the acquisition and hoarding of material goods, and that people and their welfare should be his concern.

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(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leontes)

Leontes, in Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale, allows baseless and unprovoked jealousy to overtake him, and he becomes a vicious tyrant who casts out his loving wife and infant daughter.  He also loses his son to death as a consequence of his terrible actions. It is only at the end of the play when he sees a “statue” of his wife Hermione come to life that he is able to understand the enormous errors he has made and their horrible consequences.  He has to face knowing that his actions cause deep and almost unimaginable pain to other people.  At the end of the play, he is a changed man, one who seemingly has grown as a result of his wife’s extraordinary act of mercy.  His redemption can come only through the forgiveness of another.

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(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stand)

At the beginning of Stephen King’s epic The Stand, Larry Underwood is a dissolute rock and roll emerging star, who has fallen prey to temptation, drugs, and a very dangerous crowd. He comes back east to visit his mother just in time for the outbreak of Captain Trips. If you have not read this book, I will go no further with the plot, but I do recommend it highly.  King acknowledged that this book was his homage to Lord Of The Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien and the same level of epic sweep and individual morality and action occurs here.  For Larry Underwood, his most powerful moment is that of personal sacrifice.

As a writer, a reader, and a teacher, I am very interested in how characters change within the arc of a story.  I would want to ask these three how it felt to achieve their most powerful changes at or near the climax of the pieces.

Are there any characters, who have achieved redemption, whom you would like to speak with about their journey within their tale?

 

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbook

Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

FOE_Cover_French

 

Available on Amazon