Attitude of Gratitude June 13 2018

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This is a wonderful thought!

Annette Rochelle Aben

Thank you for your attitude of gratitude!

Inspiration can be found in a conversation, a sunset or a time of great pain. Motivation must be found within yourself.

Affirmation:  I motivate myself to my greater good!

I appreciate you. Love, Annette

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Quotations on Freedom of the Press

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“Freedom of the Press, if it means anything at all, means the freedom to criticize and oppose”

                                                                 George Orwell

 

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“Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost.”

                                                                Thomas Jefferson

 

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“Whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the freeness of speech.”

                                                                Benjamin Franklin

 

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“Let us never forget that those who oppress freedom by attacking the freedom of the press are neither patriots nor lovers of democracy.”

                                                                Charles F. French

 

Favorite Horror Films of the 1920s: The Hunchback of Notre Dame: Revisited

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I have been a fan of horror movies since I was a child. I grew up watching Universal movies from the 1930s and 1940s being shown on various themed TV shows with horror hosts. As an adult, my love for these films has not waned; in fact, it has grown and helped to feed my scholarly interest in film. I use these films in some of the classes I teach in college.

For this series, I will try to limit my choices of film to 2-4 representative examples.  Two films, in particular, stand out to me from the 1920s.  They both starred Lon Chaney Sr., the Man of a Thousand Faces, and were made by Universal Studios.

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The first film is The Hunchback of Notre Dame, (1923) based on the Victor Hugo novel, and it is an extraordinary piece of cinema that stands up today. It was a very expensive production at the time.  Estimates range in the $1,250,000 to $1,500,000 range.  Given the year, that is a huge sum of money. The movie accurately reflects Hugo’s examination of the capacity of human beings to be intensely cruel to each other and of the abuse of power by those in positions of authority.  Wallace Worsley directed the film, and Lon Chaney Sr. gave a magnificent performance as Quasimodo.  It is also important to remember that Mr. Chaney created all of his own makeups.  If all you know of this story is the Disney version, you need to see this production.  I would consider it one of the best and most important films ever made.

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The Phantom of the Opera (1925) starring Lon Chaney Sr. is based on Gaston Leroux’s novel and was a huge success. Chaney played the deformed writer who falls in love with a singer and who becomes her kidnapper. This tale of horror and love has been redone numerous times, including the well known stage musical, but none of those productions have reached the sterling height of this extraordinary film.  As with the Hunchback, Chaney created this makeup, and his performance is sublime.  Again, if you have not seen this film,  I recommend it highly.

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Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

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Reflections on a Silent Sea~

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Here are more beautiful photos from Cindy Knoke, and a post about a very important issue.


The Salton Sea,

in summertime,

is scorching,

solitary,

stark,

and stunning.

No one here but you,

and the silent sea.
Good news for a change! California voters passed Proposition 68 this week which will allocate $200 million dollars towards saving The Salton Sea. The monies are earmarked towards rebuilding the wetlands that are so crucial to migrating birds and to conserving all the wildlife that depend upon the sea. Funds are also allocated to mitigate the harmful dust that is damaging human health. Everyday, amidst all the negative news, people do very good things! Thank you California voters for protecting our wild creatures and wild spaces.
Cheers to you from the soon to be saved Salton Sea~

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Thank You to Readers!

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I have thanked writers before, and I will again, but it is also important to recognize the other crucial element in a writing relationship, and that is the readers.  Without readers, books are simply words on a page, without being seen, known, imagined, or interpreted.

I love reading as much as I love writing, and I hope that readers continue to indulge in whatever kind of writing they enjoy.

To me, reading is one of the most important joys in life, along with romance and food.  I read every day, and I often have as many as five books going at one time. I teach English Literature, so reading is also part of my work, but I always have at least one book around that I consider my dessert reading. And since I love desserts, I am not, in any way, diminishing those books.  They simply serve a different purpose from the literature I teach.

My mother instilled the love of reading in me when I was very young, and I cannot remember not being able to read. It is a joy that will stay with me the rest of my life.

I am, therefore, on both sides of this creative relationship: writer and reader.

So once again, to those without whom writers are nothing, thank you! And please keep reading.

Thank you to all readers!

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The Little Mermaid Girl and the Great Shark – A Short Story for All Ages by K. D. Dowdall

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Here is a beautiful story from K.D. Dowdall!

K. D. Dowdall

There was once a little girl who believed with all her heart she was a mermaid. The mermaid girl was living in Florida on the beautiful Gulf Coast, when her mother and grandmother took her and her siblings to the “Jetties” at Indian Pass to swim. It was a popular place for locals but not well known for tourists. The Jetties are breakers made of huge boulders that, like a pier, one can tie a boat up to. It wasn’t the sunniest of days to go swimming, the August sky was covered with gray clouds and the sea was rolling with drab green humps like whales coming to shore, a telling sign that in the far distance there had been a big storm churning up the waters.

The little girl was in fact, a natural mermaid. Anyone would think she had a tail, as she swam out farther than anyone…

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Why We All Should Hug a Tree

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Here is another wonderful post from Sarah at Art Expedition!

Art Expedition

trees Trees (water color; June 2018)

This month I´m joining the JUNE 2018 ART CHALLENGE: Outdoor Fun! created by my wonderful friend Charlie, creator of Doodlewash® and founder of World Watercolor Month™ (July) and World Watercolor Group™.

Once again it is open to anyone who wants to participate with watercolor painting and/or simply pencil or pen & ink sketches.

If you’re participating in the June Art Challenge, use the hashtag #doodlewashJune2018 when you post on all your social networks, and if you also use watercolor add the #WorldWatercolorGroup hashtag as well.

Today´s prompt is “Trees”: And what else can I say then that I absolutely love trees!

Trees are beautiful, they help the planet and us by producing oxygen and combating climate change.

Trees provide lovely shade in the summer and thus shield us from ultra-violet rays.

Last but not least trees provide food and prevent soil erosion.

So why not just hug…

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