A ‘Renaissance Man’ Teacher and a Crossing Guard

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Here is another wonderful post from Jennie!

A Teacher's Reflections

Steve the Crossing Guard is an extraordinary teacher.  A ‘Renaissance Man’ teacher.  He is electric.  He thinks outside of the box.  And he truly understands children.  That’s what Jennie says.

Wikipedia says:
When the term “Renaissance man” is used, it does not mean that the man really lived in the Renaissance. It can be used for anyone who is very clever at many different things, no matter when that person lived. Albert Schweitzer was a 20th century “Renaissance man” who was a theologian, musician, philosopher and doctor.[3]Benjamin Franklin was a “Renaissance man” who lived in the 18th century (1700s) and was an author and printer, politician, scientist, inventor and soldier.[4]

That is Steve.  His latest blog post sums up what he did this school year at his ‘curbside classroom.’  Hang on for a great ride, and get ready to be challenged. …

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Quotations on Education

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“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”

                                                                     Nelson Mandela

 

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“The mind once enlightened cannot again become dark.”

                                                                     Thomas Paine

 

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“He who opens a school door, closes a prison.”

                                                                     Victor Hugo

Small Town America

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Jennie, thank you for this!

A Teacher's Reflections

Driving the back roads of New Hampshire today.

Every town had pristine flags flying.

The flags seemed proud,

whether they were on a utility pole, or a home,

or planted in the ground.

Small towns and their many flags give a big reverence.

Thank you to all who have served, and to the members of our military who protect our freedom and our country every day.  Those flags speak loud and clear.

Jennie

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Remember to Honor Memorial Day

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I hope all of you have a wonderful weekend, but I also hope you remember why this holiday exists.  The word “holiday” comes from “holy day,” and the remembrance of this day and its purpose should be sacred. It was originally known as Decoration Day after the end of the Civil War, and it was designated Memorial Day in the 20th Century.

This day is intended to honor, give thanks, and remember those who have sacrificed their lives for The United States of America.  Please honor the fallen and the wounded on this day.  I realize the day was meant originally for the dead, but I extend my wishes and  thanks to the wounded also. Regardless of political beliefs or stands on a war, these are the men and women who fought to keep us safe, and they deserve our remembrance.

They deserve our thanks and our honor.

Please keep in mind that this day is not merely the beginning of the summer season, nor is it intended to be the time of a special sale. This should be a sacred and somber time. There will be plenty of opportunity for shopping and vacationing afterwards. Please remember those who sacrificed.

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Quotations on Writing First Drafts by Charles F. French

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“Do not revise while writing a first draft!”

 

“No first draft is ever perfect, nor should it be.”

 

“Remember that writing is never finished–it is due.”

(This quotation or something like it has been offered by many teachers of writing.)

 

Get The Draft Done!  — The title of my upcoming book.

 

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Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

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Available on Amazonf

 

 

 

 

 

A Dragon Is Born

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Here is a wonderful piece of art — a baby dragon — from Sarah!

Art Expedition

Those of you following me on Instagram might already have seen it, but I thought I would share it with you here on my blog as well:

My little baby dragon, freshly hatched from its egg!!

DSC_0191 (1) Baby Dragon (Clay, 2019)

I formed it with white clay and then applied a glaze that gives it this amazing metallic shimmer!

As you can see, my little one is quite hungry, begging for seconds all the time. 😉

Dragons are usually carnivores, but so far he’s happy lapping up some mango juice and gobbling down the occasional egg. 😉

DSC_0196 (1) Baby Dragon (Clay, 2019)

I’ve always been a huge dragon fan, reading every story I could get my hands on, like my all-time favorite “The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien (even thought Smaug is quite the Bad Boy really), the Harry Potter books by J.K. Rowling, the wonderful novels by Christopher Paolini (“Eragon” being the…

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Echoes of the Past

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Here is a wonderful post from John Bainbridge!

Walking the Old Ways

When I walk I always see more than one landscape. There’s obviously what you see out on your walk today, but there are all those other landscapes too. The landscapes of the past, and those are all merged together in the present lie of the land – a glorious palimpsest.

DSCF1245 Stepping Stones at Crosby Ravnsworth (c) John Bainbridge 2019

For the observant walker, this is a joy, for it brings our history to life, many periods of that history, and all there to be considered.

When I see ancient plough marks I can almost see the ancient ploughman who made them, rather like an illustration on a modern paperback of Piers Plowman. See that ruined cottage and think of the people who lived there perhaps a century or two ago. Walk the old paths and think of the way they were used in past times. You can almost visualise the…

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