The Fishing Cat: A Truly Unique Feline

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Here is a wonderful post from Josh Gross about an amazing and unique feline!

The Jaguar

A photo of a fishing cat taken by Srikanth Mannepuri. Image © Fishing Cat Conservancy.

This post is an introduction to the ecology and conservation of a truly unique species: the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus). It is the second entry in a three-part series about fishing cats and a non-profit organization called the Fishing Cat Conservancy, whom I shall write about next week.

Size

The fishing cat is a medium-sized cat: recorded weights for the species range from 5.1-6.8 kg for females, and 8.5-16 kg for males.1 That translates to 11.2-15 lb for females and 18.7-35.3 lb for males, which is slightly smaller than a bobcat (Lynx rufus).

Range and Habitat

The fishing cat has a wide but patchy range. It occurs in fragmented habitats in parts of:

A fishing cat watching the water, presumably waiting for prey. Photo taken by Srikanth Mannepuri…

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This is me

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Allow me to introduce another one of my English 11 class!

Luca Milletti Engl 011

Hi! My name is Luca Milletti and I am a freshman at Lehigh University, exploring the depths of literature via blog posts in my English class. I am originally from San Francisco, California. Although I am an engineer, I have always had a hidden love for reading and writing because my high school pushed writing and reading skills on its students so much; on the other hand, I have been out of touch with literature for so long and I am looking to rekindle that love for genres I used to enjoy reading so much. Out of all of the literature I have read, I enjoy reading horror, fiction and realistic fiction the most, and my favorite series of books have been the Harry Potter series and, when I was younger, the Percy Jackson series. I am looking forward to posting more on this site and I am hoping to…

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Semi-Self-Published English Student

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Here is an introductory post from one of my students in my English 11 class at Lehigh University.

genreBella

My name is Isabella King. A student at Lehigh University and I am excited to share a small excerpt (about the first two paragraphs) of a book I wrote senior year of high school.

Many more edits are in the works although there are a few printed copies out there.

Chapter One
2099-10-01 18:36:03
Today is the first of October, and it might be
the last day that I am me. I’m told what I’m doing is
right, and both my naivety and guilt keep me from
disagreeing. But, even if my conscience decided to
change its mind today it’d be too late. By the time, I
rest my head on a pillow tonight-well, will there be
pillows? Doesn’t matter. I’m filled with so many
questions I feel like my brain is going to override and
fry up, in the next hour, though, I guess my brain will
feel less…

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Superheroes

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Here is another wonderful post from Jennie on children as superheroes!

A Teacher's Reflections

Superheroes showed up at school today.

Captain America and Wonder Woman.  And a Ninja.  But the children told me a Ninja isn’t really a Superhero.  Aren’t they smart!

Superheroes are far more than heroes with super powers.  They give children an “I Can” attitude, a stronger sense of self.  They make children feel good and see the good.  After all, it’s goodness that we strive for, along with knowledge.  John Phillips said it well in the 1700’s:

“Goodness without knowledge is weak and feeble, yet knowledge without goodness is dangerous, and both united form the noblest character and lay the surest foundation of usefulness to mankind.”

Superheroes give children and teachers an opportunity to impart goodness and knowledge, an “I can do it” attitude, and the will to keep trying.  It’s the power of ‘yet’.  Thank you, Superheroes!

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Roosevelt Franklin’s Guilty Pleasures: Revisited–from Maledicus: Investigative Paranormal Society, Book 1 by Charles F. French

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20160603_184437

Roosevelt Franklin, the protagonist in my horror novel Maledicus: Investigative Paranormal Society Book I, is a man who does not allow himself many indulgences. Despite being able to afford almost any whim he might desire, he does not grant himself many. He does, however, have two guilty pleasures that he loves to enjoy: fine cigars and good whisk(e)y. The spelling depends on if the alcohol is American, with an “e” or Irish or Scotch without the “e”.

Even though he has a heart condition and is 68 years old, he refuses to give up smoking one cigar and drinking a couple of fingers of whisky each day. He knows that he is on the downslide of life, but he does not intend to give up these enjoyments.

Roosevelt prefers strong cigars. He is a lover of strong flavors, from coffee to whisky and cigars. His favorite is a CAO Brazilia Churchill length. This cigar is intended for experienced smokers, with a deep, rich flavor and powerful smoke. Roosevelt chooses the Churchill length because he likes to make the experience last, usually at night and paired with a good whiskey.

Roosevelt enjoys good American bourbon and Irish and Scotch single malt whiskys. His favorite bourbon is Maker’s Mark, a standard of excellence. It is rich with a strong flavor, but it is also very smooth. His preferred Irish whisky is John Powers, a very smooth drink. His favorite single malt Scotch whisky is the 18 year old Macallan, as Roosevelt calls it—the finest whisky in the world. It is smooth, rich, and strong, with no bite. It is a perfect dram of whisky.

At the moment, Roosevelt is drinking a rare single malt Scotch whisky–the 15 year old Macallan, which is very smooth and has extremely deep and complex flavors.

Roosevelt certainly understands that not everyone will agree with his opinions on these cigars and alcohol, and he respects others’ views, but he holds firm on his sentiments.

20160603_184651

(images from personal photographs)

 

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbook

Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

FOE_Cover_French

 

Available on Amazon

What Is The Opening Paragraph of One of Your Books? A Book Promotion Party!

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I thought it would be interesting to do a book promotion party by giving not only the name of your book and what it is about but also the opening paragraph.

I offer the following from Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book 1 by Charles F. French:

“Lucius Antony Caius exalted in his good fortune. He was in complete control of his destiny, of his place in the world. Not for him was the belief in the three sisters of fate–they would not measure and cut his string of life. Caius, also known as Maledicus, as he was called because of his odd lisping voice coupled with the grating sound of sandpaper grinding on coarse wood and with his personality, believed he controlled the world. And his evil persona caused others to fear him. He didn’t look like the image of a strong Roman–he was short and fat, with little hair, but he was as dangerous as the most powerful general.”

So, if you would like to join the party and promote your book, please offer a quotation!

Have fun, promote your book, and please share this post.

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbook

Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

FOE_Cover_French

 

Available on Amazon

More Than Reading Aloud – SSR

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Here is another wonderful post by the excellent teacher, Jennie!

A Teacher's Reflections


Penguin Books, The Read-Aloud Handbook, 2013

It is a given that I read aloud to children multiple times a day.  I know, and you know, that it makes a difference.  In this blog post, I will address more than reading aloud – combining what really happens and why, with facts and stories from The Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease, and real events in my classroom.

Reading is the heart of education.  The knowledge of almost every subject in school flows from reading.  One must be able to read the word problem in math to understand it.  If you cannot read the science or social studies chapter, how do you answer the question at the end of the chapter?

I’ve given you the ‘bad news’ before:
Every kindergartener wants to read.  By fourth grade, 54% read something for pleasure every day.  By eighth grade, 30% read for pleasure daily.  By twelfth…

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