50 reviews on Amazon for Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society, Book 1 by Charles F. French

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I have to celebrate a bit–my horror novel Maledicus The Investigative Paranormal Society, Book 1 now has 50 reviews on Amazon! It has been several years, but I am excited about the milestone.

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

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Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

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Gallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

 

 

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Available on Amazon

Now on to the next 50 reviews!

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Motivational Quotes

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Here are a few excellent quotations on motivation from J. Fisher!

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Hey everyone, it has been awhile since I posted something on here so I thought I would start off with some motivational quotes. I hope you enjoy them.

“You have to do the work. You have to hold the line. You have to make it happen.”
-Jocko Willink

“The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”
-Mark Twain

“Opportunity does not knock, it presents itself when you beat down the door.”
-Kyle Chandler

“A somebody was once a nobody who wanted to and did.”
-John Burroughs

“Get creative. Get aggressive. Get it done. When you are on the road, STAY ON THE PATH.”
-Jocko Willink

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What Is One Of Your Favorite Movies?

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I thought I would ask this question again: What is one of your favorite movies?

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I have posted before about favorite books.  I will come back to that idea again in the not too distant future, but I was thinking about movies, because I am going to teach a hybrid online/traditional in-class course on Literature and Film at Muhlenberg College for The Wescoe School (the adult program) this summer. This will be an early question I will ask my students, so it is only fair that I think about it.

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My answer would be the same as if this question were for books: The Lord of the Rings by director Peter Jackson (all 3 movies considered to be one–the same as with the books.) I think this adaptation is one of the best adaptations of a book to movie that has ever been accomplished. I love the depth of the story, the issues raised of political power and corruption, war and peace, good and…

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Quotations on Character

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“The final forming of a person’s character lies in their own hands.”

                                                                  Anne Frank

 

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“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character, give him power.”

                                                                 Abraham Lincoln

 

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“It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”

                                                                Mark Twain

A Guest Post for the ULS, The Underground Library Society, by Jennie Fitzkee

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Thank you to Jennie Fitzkee for her guest post for the U.L.S., the Underground Library Society. She deals with a book that is easily misunderstood as being racist, and she details that the story is really about India and not African-Americans. It is important to make the distinction between perception of racism and actual racism, as Jennie does.  Now for her post:

In 1899 Helen Bannerman wrote a children’s book, Little Black Sambo, after she and her husband had lived in India for thirty years.  Helen was born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, and she fondly remembered those years in India.  The classic story is about a little boy who outwits tigers in the jungle.  I dearly loved this story when I was a child, particularly the tigers turning into butter when they ran in circles around the tree.

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The boy’s name is Little Black Sambo, his mother is Black Mumbo, and his father is Black Jumbo.  That is perhaps (most likely) the root of controversy and the banning of this book.  Over the years people have projected the story to be about blacks in the south.  Different versions were published, even a board game.  The degradation of blacks was both sad and appalling.

 

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And so, it was banned in many places over the years.  “A typical pickaninny storybook which was hurtful to black children.”  Those were the comments and reasons for banning the book.  When I heard the story as a child, I also thought the characters were blacks from the south.

 

Fast forward to 1996.  Fred Marcellino, an artist and illustrator, read the story.  He said, “There are no racist overtones.”  And there are none.  Zero.  It’s merely the perception because of the names of the characters.  So, Fred illustrated a new edition of the book.  He did not change one word of the text.  He simply changed the names of the characters to be authentic to India – Babaji, Mamaji, and Papaji.

 

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I read this book all the time in my classroom of preschoolers.  They revel in chanting the words of the tigers.  They love the book as much as I did as a child.  We do play performances about this book.  Really!

And of course, tigers live in India, not the southern states in America.  So, shame on those naysayers and book banners.  They should have known better.

I vow to memorize the words to this classic story.

Thank you Jennie for the post, and welcome to the U.L.S.

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