More Reviews of Maledicus: The Paranormal Investigative Society Book 1

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I wanted to share this post of reviews again!

charles french words reading and writing

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“I loved this book and could NOT put it down! Written by an English professor, it is an absorbing, addictive story that left me continually wondering what would happen next. (Even while I WAS reading, I had to keep myself from glancing ahead to find out!)
I was once told the earmark of a successful novel is that the author has created characters the reader really cares about, and this certainly was the case for me. I worried about them. Putting the book down made me feel I was abandoning them to their suffering and keeping them in limbo.

Maledicus is clearly a thriller filled with the stark and chilling reality of evil — but, in its delicate balance, I found that it also reassures us of the enduring power of love.”

                                                                                                          Vivien L. Steele

“This is a layered, entertaining tale. Opening the action in ancient Rome gives depth…

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Southern Giant Petrels~

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Here are more beautiful photographs from Cindy Knoke!


Southern Giant Petrels (SGP’s) are the largest birds in the pelagic petrel family with wingspans of up to 6.7 feet.

They live in the southern hemisphere and are circumpolar, distributed in the sub-antarctic to Antarctica.

They are bigger than Northern Giant Petrels and are rated one of the ten oddest looking birds in the world due to their unusual stacked bi-valve nostrils joined together on the top of their beaks.

This bivalve, in combination with a saline eliminating gland, helps them eliminate salt from the large quantities of saltwater they consume.

Like pelagic Albatrosses, SGP’s spend the first two to three years of their lives entirely at sea. White phase SGP’s, like the one flying here, are rare, constituting less than 5% of the SGP population.

It is incredible to watch them mid-ocean taking off, catching wind drafts and soaring like kites.

They are aggressive predators and scavengers, and incredibly…

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Quotations From Shakespeare: A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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MND

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare is one of my favorite plays, and I have had a life long connection with this work. I have read it, seen numerous productions, acted in it, directed it, studied it in college and graduate school, written about it, delivered a conference paper on it, and taught the play in college at the Wescoe School of Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA. So, you can see that I have had quite a relationship with this wonderful play.

As a simple tribute to Shakespeare and this play, I offer a few quotations from A Midsummer Night’s Dream:

“Captain of our fairy band,

 Helena is here at hand,

 And the youth, mistook by me,

 Pleading for a lover’s fee.

 Shall we their fond pageant see?

 Lord, what fools these mortals be!”

                                             (Act 3. Scene 2. Lines 110-115)

 

“I have had a most rare vision. I have had a dream, past the wit of man to say what dream it was.”

                                             (Act 4. Scene 2. Lines 203-204)

 

“If we shadows have offended,

 Think but this, and all is mended,

 That you have but slumbered here

 While this visions did appear.

 And this weak and idle theme,

 No more yielding but a dream,

 Gentles, do not reprehend.

 If you pardon, we will mend.

 And, as I am an honest Puck,

 If we have unearned luck

 Now to scrape the serpent’s tongue,

 We will make amends ere long;

 Else the Puck a liar call.

 So, good night unto you all.

 Give me your hands, if we be friends,

 And Robin shall restore amends.” (Act 5. Scene 1. Lines 418-433)

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Yet…

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Jennie, This is another lovely post!

A Teacher's Reflections

Yet.  It’s a word I use often at school with children.  When they try hard and struggle, and say, “I can’t”, I add the word “yet”.  A child might not be able to do it just now, but with practice they will.  Yet.

Today the tables were turned.  ‘Yet’ became the children’s words to me.  Here is what happened:

It was a rainy day.  There was extra time for music and the autoharp.  Children picked their favorite songs, and we sang and danced.  “Five Little Monkeys” was a top request, multiple times.  Then, children wanted to sing “Red White and Blue.”  With the autoharp.

I don’t know how to play that song, but I have the book.  Maybe the book has the music.”

The book had the music on the last page.  Life was good.  Well, it wasn’t good.  I showed children how there were letters above the score…

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The magic of storytelling

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This is a wonderful post!

Norah Colvin

Guiding parents in play sessions for parents and children.

Telling stories to and with young children has many benefits. Including other things, it helps to develop:

  • relationships with the storyteller and other listeners
  • language – vocabulary, language structure, imagery
  • understanding of narrative structure as it applies to fiction and non-fiction accounts
  • curiosity about one’s family, the immediate environment, and other places
  • empathy for others
  • interest in books and reading
  • imagination

There is something very special about telling, as opposed to reading, stories. The telling can be more fluid, more interactive, and change with the mood and with input from teller and listener. The distinction between teller and listener can blur and roles can change as the story flows.

Sometimes it is the routine and the relationships that are more important and more memorable than any one story. For example, a parent telling stories as part of the bedtime ritual, stories told by a visiting grandparent, aunt or uncle, or…

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Moments

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This is another wonderful poem from novelist and poet, K.D. Dowdall!

K. DeMers Dowdall

The moments pass,

One by one,

From dawn to dusk,

Bursting into life,

Light as air,

We sense their passing,

Like a shooting star,

A moment,

Across the sky,

Let us give,

To the moments,

What they deserve,

For theirs,

Is the strength of time,

For a moment in time,

Is a treasure,

Worth more,

Than the passing of a year,

I ask you then,

For precious moments,

We keep,

And care not,

For the dwindling years.

By K. D. Dowdall

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