Good, Evil & Supernatural Horror: Does What You Believe Color Your Fiction?

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KC Redding-Gonzalez writes an excellent and engaging essay about the connection of belief and horror fiction.

Zombie Salmon (the Horror Continues)

I once read an essay (now long lost) that suggested Catholic Horror writers wrote better Horror…

I don’t remember the argument or the examples, but the question has stayed with me well past my own conversion to Catholicism. I deny, of course, that I converted for the Horror. But it is fun to say. And it also means this is a question that has dogged my reading and writing career.

Is it true? Do Catholics write better Horror? And more importantly, does what you believe affect not only choices you make in writing Horror, but the quality of the stories you tell?

Evil1The Question of Faith

One of the most interesting facets of Horror fiction is that it perpetually asks: what is the relevance of faith?

Modern characters are often nonreligious, agnostic or atheistic, and are left defenseless to confront the evils of the world – up to and including…

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10 thoughts on “Good, Evil & Supernatural Horror: Does What You Believe Color Your Fiction?

  1. Interesting. People have said that one of the unique things about the gothic novel is how you can pin down its start point to Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto (1764). I would add that for at least 50 years the genre was caught up in the Protestant/Catholic turmoil of 18th-century England. From Walpole to Anne Radcliffe and Matthew Lewis, gothic fiction was arguably a generic attack on Catholic superstition and moral corruption … but push the devil out of the front door and he comes in at that back. Evil or not, the supernaturalism associated with the Catholic villains turns out the be true in most of the novels. So the Protestant fascination with Catholic mystery persists even when they are ostensibly vilifying Catholic culture. Food for thought anyway 🙂

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