Favorite Horror Movies of the 1930s: The Invisible Man

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Here is another film in my horror movie series.

charles french words reading and writing

The-Invisible-Man

(en.wikipedia.org)

One of the more interesting and unusual horror films of the 1930s is The Invisible Man, directed by James Whale and produced by Carl Laemelle Jr. for Universal Studios (1933). This film is based on H.G. Wells’ novel of the same name, and it is a reasonably close adaptation of the book. Some changes were made to the story line, notably the addition of a love interest and moving the time from the Victorian Era to the 1930s.

Wells_The_Invisible_Man

(en.wikipedia.org)

The film was unusual in the caliber and sophistication of the special effects, which still hold up to contemporary scrutiny.  It is important to remember that these filmmakers were not using computer generated images to create their effects; rather, they were forced to create from ingenuity, creating new techniques in cinematic art.  The end result shows visual images that are still powerful and compelling.

The story is well told…

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10 thoughts on “Favorite Horror Movies of the 1930s: The Invisible Man

  1. Upon reflection about the old horror films, they seem to have not been so in your face scary as horror films are now. Now they are so much more real feeling and I find myself going back to the old films more and more. I remember this movie, someone must have had it on in the house at one time. I think there was a series on television with the same name. Loved the concept. 🙂

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  2. I have not yet read this book, only having watched the 1930’s movie adaptation(I love the horror movies of that period). Thank you very much for sharing, and after reading your review, I will definitely be reading The Invisible Man. In addition, I couldn’t agree more for the brilliance of Claude Rains.

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