The Written Word, The Writer, and Morality

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This is an excellent post on the question of writers and morality.

K. D. Dowdall

Sam Harris, philosopher, neuroscientist, writer and author writes, “Human well-being is not a random phenomenon. It depends on many factors – ranging from genetics and neurobiology to sociology and economics. But, clearly, there are scientific truths to be known about how we can flourish in this world. Wherever we can have an impact on the well-being of others, questions of morality apply.”

     Morality is complicated. Morality is subjective. Morality is ethics. Morality is judgment. Morality is not universal. Morality is societal, Morality is personal.  As writers, we often write about heroics, doing-the-right-thing, righting wrongs, standing up to injustice, caring for others, human rights as moral convictions, judging as a moral imperative, life-saving as a moral imperative, killing evil-doers as a moral imperative.

    What I do know is that morality is in the eye of the beholder’s belief systems. Writers, whether consciously or unconsciously, liberally sow the seeds of…

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4 thoughts on “The Written Word, The Writer, and Morality

  1. Morality is complicated, with many external factors that shape us and form our own morality. As writers, we naturally write what we feel, thus morality has a being in our written word. We sow the seeds of our beliefs whether we realize it or not. I think that is why teaching feels important to me. Thank you for sharing this!

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