Response to Evil

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This is a reblogging of an earlier post about a central theme in my horror novel–Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

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Maledicus Final

Copyright @ 2016 by Charles F. French

Edmund Burke said, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing.” This issue is one of the central themes of my horror novel Maledicus: Investigative Paranormal Society Book I and is also one of the main issues that has faced humanity in the last one hundred years. From the consequences of millions slain in the Holocaust to one single person murdered on the streets of New York City while many watched and did nothing, humanity has been confronted with this dilemma. When finding evil threatening others, what do we do? Do we ignore it and pretend that it is not there? Do we call authorities to try to handle the situation and hope they arrive in time? Or do we inject ourselves into situations that for both individuals and nations could be filled with the worst…

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Blogger Appreciation Award

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I have received numerous blogger awards, and I appreciate all of them.  I thought, though, it was time I created one to show my appreciation for the wonderful bloggers I have met. I have given this award a while ago, but it has been sometime, so I decided to give it again.

The Rules of the Award:

The rules are simple.

(1) Thank the blogger who nominated you, link back to their site.

(2) Write a paragraph of something positive about yourself.

(3) Nominate and notify as many bloggers as you wish.

(4) Use the award image.

My nominees: (If you have not visited these blogs, please make a trip to them.)

K.D. Dowdall at Midnight In The Garden https://karendowdall.com

K.C. Redding-Gonzalez  at Zombie Salmon (The Horror Continues)     https://zombiesalmonthehorrorcontinues.wordpress.com

Aubrey’s Arch https://aubreysarch.com/

Ela at The Urban Kit https://theurbankit.wordpress.com/

Send Sunshine  https://upliftingquotesdaily.com/

Dehan Taylor at Motivation with Dehan https://dehantaylor.com/

Tony Burgess at The Tony Burgess Blog https://tonyburgess1969.net/

Miss Gentileschi at Secret Art Expedition https://secretartexpedition.wordpress.com/

Richard M. Ankers at Richard M. Ankers   https://richardankers.com

Amy Reese at The Bumble Files  https://amyreesewrites.com/

Thanks to all of you for your fine blogs!

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ABOUT WRITING – Techniques for Masterful Writing

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This is a very useful post for writers!

Pen & Paper

fmmy21ohmklukw3-medium.jpgAbout Writing: A Summary of K.M. Weiland’s, “Techniques for Masterful Writing”

By K.D. Dowdall

I am re-blogging this post from 2014. My summary of K.M. Weiland’s excellent article presented in Writer’s Digest, Work Book: Exercises and Tips for Honing Specific Aspects of Your Writing presents the key points of her exceptional article. It is especially for writers penning their first novel, but also for seasoned writers to again remember a classic, Jane Eyre, a novel that was ahead of its time, by Charlotte Brontë.  Often, reading classics, as most of us do, gives us fresh insight to dramatic storytelling par excellence, and can improve our own writing skills. K.M. Weiland gives us 10 distinct techniques for dramatic masterful writing.  For me, I chose to read Jane Eyre.

  1. Hook: Start in the middle of some type of interaction within environment, statement, or internal angst to provoke reader curiosity.
  1. Characteristic Moment

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Quotations on Imagination

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“Logic will get you from A to Z; imagination will get you everywhere.”

                                                                Albert Einstein

 

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“Vision is the art of seeing things invisible.”

                                                                Jonathan Swift

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(Martin Droeshout Portrait)

“The lunatic, the lover and the poet,

Are of imagination all compact. . .

And as imagination bodies forth

The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen

Turns them into shapes, and gives to airy nothing

A local habitation and a name.”

              William Shakespeare

                    A Midsummer Night’s Dream

                      (Act 5. Scene 1. lines 7-17)

 

Writing Progress

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I believe I have not done an update in a few months on my writing progress, so I will do so now.  I have finished a first draft of book 2 of my young adult series: The Ameriad.  Now like most first drafts, it is not very good, and I am being charitable, and it needs massive revision, but it is done. As I say to other writers and to my students, get a draft done, otherwise you have nothing to work on.  Now I have about 50,000 words for future revisions. I am anticipating both cutting and adding in the next draft.

That means, I will continue on my plan on completing 2 first drafts every year.  I now move on to book 2 of The Investigative Paranormal Society.  Each book in this series will focus on one of the three older gentlemen who form the nucleus of the group. This one will center on Sam, the retired homicide detective.  So, to work with this!  I hope to have the draft done by the end of the year.

And I am moving along with the manuscript of my horror novel, Maledicus:  Investigative Paranormal Society Book I. I will shortly send it out to be formatted, both for ebook and printing, and I am aiming at a release in late September. I will keep you informed as I move forward with promotion on it.

In addition to drafting, I am always revising also.  So I try to find separate times to do both most days.  I am now beginning a major revision of book one of my young adult series.  I will speak more of this in future posts.

Remember folks, keep writing and revising!

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Happy Independence Day!

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I wish all a happy and safe 4th of July.  Please celebrate safely, have fun, and take a moment to remember all those who sacrificed to bring freedom.

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Let us also remember that freedom includes everyone of all races, religions, ethnicities, backgrounds, classes, sexual orientations, creeds, and neurodiversities–and any others I may have forgotten.  Freedom demands inclusion, not exclusion. We must always remember that. We are all connected. We, all of us, are the people.

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R.I.P. Elie Wiesel

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Elie Wiesel, the Nobel laureate, and author of Night, his memoir of being a prisoner in the Holocaust, died this weekend.  Mr. Wiesel, besides being an extraordinary writer, whose work brought the experience of the evil of the Holocaust to the forefront of many readers, was also one of the most powerful moral voices of our time.

I read Mr. Wiesel’s book Night as a teenager, and I was deeply struck by the power and the messages it contains.  I made a connection with the horror of the Holocaust and the hope of humanity through this text.  I will keep the discussion of my personal impact of this book short, because it is so deep and so complex that I could write forever on it.  But, it was another lesson that we are all connected and must remember this joint humanity–always.

Mr. Wiesel argued powerfully that it is not enough to simply not do evil, but that it is the moral responsibility of people to oppose it wherever it exists. He said, “Whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation, we must always take sides.” and “As long as one dissident is in prison, our freedom will not be true. As long as one child is hungry, our lives will be filled with anguish and shame. What all these victims need above all is to know that they are not alone; that we are not forgetting them, that when their voices are stifled we shall lend them ours, that while their freedom depends on ours, the quality of our freedom depends on theirs. (From his Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech.)

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President Obama, in speaking of him, said of Mr. Wiesel, “Elie Wiesel was one of the great moral voices of our time, and in many ways, the conscience of the world.”

We should honor his work and commitment to justice, and we should remember, especially in our turbulent times, often filled with hatred and bigotry, that we are morally compelled to oppose injustice and bigotry.

Rest In Peace, Elie Wiesel.  The world will miss you.

Tales of Terror (and When They Aren’t)

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This is an excellent essay on horror and worth reading for all interested in horror, gothic, and literature.

Zombie Salmon (the Horror Continues)

For those who would read our genre because they were seduced by the emotionally rich words “tales of terror” in a title, there has been an unfortunate turn of events. The word “terror” in the Horror genre has joined a pantheon of keywords that seem to have lost their spark, their ability to sizzle and frighten. We loyally buy books labelled “tales of terror” only to come away feeling misled, cheated, confused.

Did we not understand what was intended?

I have long asked myself why old works are still potent even today, and new works are simply flat and featureless. What has changed in the geography of our prose? If being modern and sophisticated does not neutralize stories of the past, then we are surely doing something different now. But what?

Something has clearly changed. Something wicked this way comes. And it is looking like fans of the Horror genre…

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