Roosevelt Theodore Franklin’s Humanism

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art-school-of-athens-1143741_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

( by Raphael ~1510)

“Each man’s death diminishes me,
For I am involved in mankind.
Therefore, send not to know
For whom the bell tolls,
It tolls for thee.”

John Donne from Meditation 17 (1624)

Roosevelt Theodore Franklin, the protagonist of my supernatural thriller and horror novel Maledicus: Investigative Paranormal Society Book I, is a retired history professor whose main area of study was the occult during the Renaissance. He paid special attention to Marsilio Ficino, Giovani Pico della Mirandola, John Dee, and Giordano Bruno. The work he holds in the most regard is Pico’s “Oration on the Dignity of Man,” a piece often considered to be the Humanist Manifesto, and one in which Pico asserts that human beings have the capacity to rise like eagles or sink into the muck like insects.

For Roosevelt, the Renaissance represents a time with an explosion of new ideas, confronting the status quo and forcing the exploration of new forms of knowledge. In many ways, he believes it was similar to the 20th century.

Pico1

(https://es.wikipedia.org)

Perhaps the most crucial and important element from this period for Roosevelt was the creation of Humanism, a philosophy that he considered to be central to his way of life and consideration of the world. He rejects post-modernism and its denial of truth; he sees the existence of truth, but that it is a search one must continue throughout the entirety of life. He denies the idea that humans are disconnected; he perceives the connection among people of which Donne spoke in the Meditation 17. If he is confronted by other academics about his ideas which are often considered out of fashion or outdated, he replies that he is not a slave to fads and that he is proud to be a humanist.

Roosevelt holds that despite our many and varied differences, we are all ultimately connected as human beings.

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(https://pixabay.com)

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23 thoughts on “Roosevelt Theodore Franklin’s Humanism

  1. belowaveragewriter

    I think this character represents a balanced position of past and present. Not jettisoning the past as so many contemporaries do, but using the past as a tool to help interpret the present; a building block. Looking forward to hearing more about him and I can definitely sympathize with his interesting in Western history!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I like the sounds of this Roosevelt Franklin! And always admire writing which compels us to read literature and research new ideas. Thank you for sharing…and thank you for following my writerly journey. Best…

    Liked by 1 person

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