Roosevelt Franklin–Anglophile–from Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I by Charles F. French

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Roosevelt Franklin, the protagonist of my horror novel Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I is a self-admitted anglophile. While a proud American with a very American name who loves his country, he is drawn to the manners and customs of England and the British Isles.

He embraces courtesy and dignity, but he despises snobbery and bigotry. He was raised in a very wealthy family, and he rejects their view that people in the classes below them are intended to serve as underlings. He loves British customs, but he abhors the rigid class system of that culture. He is more comfortable with his friends from varying backgrounds than he is enduring an evening of cocktails with his family, most of whom he has distanced himself from.

Roosevelt loves old-fashioned, hand tailored British wool suits. He feels the most at ease when he wears them. “They may look old-fashioned, but that is completely appropriate, because I am very old-fashioned,” he would say about the appearance of his attire.

He insists on showing courtesy, not as an act of thoughtless and forced behavior, but as a conscious attempt to provide a touch of civility in a decidedly uncivil world. He still handwrites thank you notes for any gifts or kindnesses he has received. “Using pen and paper shows more consideration than simply typing a note on the computer screen.” He definitely is not a fan of the contemporary so-called connected age.

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Roosevelt’s favorite authors are also British and have stood the test of time: Shakespeare and Chaucer. “To read Shakespeare is to glean what it means to be human,” was one of his favorite sayings about the Bard.

And one of his favorite meals was a traditional British style breakfast, complete, with tea or coffee, toast and jam, eggs, and rashers of bacon and sausage.  In the evening, an after dinner relaxation was drinking several fingers of excellent single malt Scotch Whisky and having a fine cigar.

For travel, no place in the world rivaled London for Roosevelt. It was simply the City to him. In his very American soul also resided an old-fashioned British gentleman.

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Please follow the following links to find my novel:

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The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

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23 thoughts on “Roosevelt Franklin–Anglophile–from Maledicus: The Investigative Paranormal Society Book I by Charles F. French

  1. Without saying too much, because I go into detail in the book, he was influenced by one of the few members in his family who he looked up to. That man also had a great interest in England.
    Also, he appreciates the pace and decorum of British life.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Christina

    Oh I love the naming of the character, that is simply brilliant! What inspired you to choose it? Would you say that there is a relation between the character and the president?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Christina,

      Thank you for your kindness! Yes, his full name is Roosevelt Theodore Franklin, so the relationship is about two presidents and his parents’ sense of humor. It is intended, though, to reflect on his character.

      Like

  3. Judie Sigdel

    I read the first 30% of Maledicus today and I am already totally engrossed with a number of the characters, especially Roosevelt Franklin. I had to force myself to put the book down so I could take care of a few “real life” tasks.

    Liked by 1 person

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