Favorite Science-Fiction Films: A Trip to the Moon (1902)

Standard

a-trip-to-the-moon-mondo-poster

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

I teach a course for the Wescoe School at Muhlenberg College: English 255 Literature & Film, which makes me very happy, because I am able to look at both literature and film, both media which I love. In one of the lectures for the class on film history, I speak to the earliest examples of cinema.

One of the first movies is also a science-fiction film: A Trip to the Moon (La Voyage Dans La Lune). Georges Méliès, one of the innovators of cinema, was the director, and he based the film, at least loosely, on Jules Verne’s novel From The Earth To The Moon (1865).

George_Melies

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

This movie is revolutionary not only in its being an early example of cinema but also in the treatment of science-fiction. Human beings have been explorers for the entirety of our existence, and this movie suggests that it was possible to move our journeys from the Earth to other worlds, a concept that informs our science-fiction cinema from the beginnings to our current films.

The plot shows scientists explaining how to get to the moon, the trip there, including a spaceship being shot out of a cannon, landing on the moon, being chased by inhabitants of the moon, and finally escaping back to Earth. This film explores adventure, imagination, advances in technology, and human potential.

Méliès,_viaggio_nella_luna_(1902)_07

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

This movie is usually considered by critics to be one of the most important in film history. It can be seen at https://archive.org/details/ATripToTheMoon1902 . If you are interested in the history of film and science-fiction, you should see this important historic and artistic film artifact.

The film runs, depending on the print from about 10-15 minutes.

Voyage_dans_la_lune_title_card

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

 

wp-1476386546701-maledicus

 

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal Society Book I

My radio interview:

interview

Reading “Little House on the Prairie”, Then and Now

Standard

This is another wonderful example of excellent teaching from Jennie.

A Teacher's Reflections

I have two stories to tell; both happened on the same day this week, yet they are fourteen years apart.  Every year my last chapter reading book at school is Little House on the Prairie.  Here is what happened:

Story One:  My school’s annual presentation of a college scholarship to a former student happened this week.  Martha, the recipient, was a preschooler in my class, way back when.  As her winning essay was read aloud, these were her some of her words:

“I have been fortunate to grow up in an environment where a love of learning was instilled in me from a young age.  Between my mom and Jennie, adults read out loud to me multiple times a day.  They also encouraged me to ask questions and to be a curious learner, which led directly to my success in high school.”

Martha and Jennie…now

Martha was the quiet one…

View original post 463 more words

8 Ways to Convince Book Bloggers to Review Your Book

Standard

This is an excellent post for writers about finding reviewers.

K. D. Dowdall

8 Ways to Convince Book Bloggers To Review Your Book

Book bloggers actually do want to review your book! But we don’t have a lot of time so when you forget to include vital information or don’t follow the submission instructions, your requests end up in the trash bin. Here are 8 ways to convince me—and other book bloggers—to review your book:

via http://www.bookdaily.com/  There’s no reason to pile on and make your request email an epic read – that’s your novel’s job. When approaching reviewers keep your request on point. Give each blogger exactly what they ask for – no more, no less. Remember, we get lots of emails and the easier you make it for us, the greater your chance of acceptance. Here’s what should always be included.

1. Reviewer’s name: Guess what? You may have to read through the blog…

View original post 761 more words

Favorite TV Shows: the 1950s: The Twilight Zone

Standard

I thought I would begin recovering the series on Television, beginning with The Twilight Zone.

charles french words reading and writing

tv-2213140_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

I had engaged recently in a conversation in which TV shows were discussed. Afterwards, I was thinking that I consider the 1950s and the 1960s to have been the era which produced the best television shows.

feedback-2044702_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

I am not claiming that the special effects were good or that the shows were slick in any way.  In some cases that I will mention, the acting was not the finest, but, and this is my point, the writing was extraordinary.

alphabets-2365812_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

I will mention one show per post and will cover more in the not too distant future.  In all cases, I am referring primarily to the writing, the story-telling, and the themes of the shows. First is The Twilight Zone, which ran from 1959-1964 and dealt with the moral, ethical, and social problems of the time.  Certainly, this show is memorable for the famous actors who appeared at…

View original post 236 more words

Quotations on Justice

Standard

Elie_Wiesel_2012_Shankbone

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

“There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.”

                                                                      Elie Wiesel

 

theodore-roosevelt-393205_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

“No man is justified in doing evil on the ground of expediency.”

                                                                      Theodore Roosevelt

 

eleanor_roosevelt_portrait_1933

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

“When will our consciences grow so tender that we will act to prevent human misery rather than avenge it?”

                                                                       Eleanor Roosevelt

Favorite Horror Films of the 1960s: The Brides of Dracula

Standard

This sequel to Horror of Dracula was Hammer Studios first vampire follow-up to their successful take on Dracula.

charles french words reading and writing

The_brides_of_dracula_logo

(https://commons.wikimedia.org)

A tsunami of horror films cascaded into movie theaters in the 1960s, some by the larger studios and an abundance of grade B-Z films from smaller companies. Following the success of Horror of Dracula, The Curse of Frankenstein, and The Mummy, Hammer created a plethora of sequels as well as new horror films. Frankenstein and Dracula would serve as the basis for the most sequels, thereby creating a seemingly non-ending money source for the studio, even as the films often became bad imitations of the original productions.

Oddly, the first sequel to The Horror of Dracula, The Brides of Dracula, (1960) does not feature Dracula as a character. Instead, the movie features a Baron Meinster, as the opening voice-over narration says is a disciple of the ongoing cult of vampirism led by the now destroyed Dracula. While Dracula does not appear, the renowned vampire…

View original post 388 more words